In the July 2002 issue, published on July 1, 2002, you will find :

  • Arun Jatkar (Monroeville, PA, USA) in his editorial article laments the recent events in Godhra and Ahmedabad in India and comments that the high officials of both Islamic and the Hindu organizations allowed to lapse an opportunity for avoiding the massive eruption of violence.

  • Sattvasheela Samant (Pune, India) makes a powerful argument for the purity of written Marathi and lambastes the state government, the scholars, the compilers of dictionaries, the publishers and editors and the news media of Maharashtra and the organizers of literary conventions for the steep downfall of the Marathi language since 1960s (Firyad hi tyanchyavari - Page 7).

  • Ramesh Waghmare  (Ottawa, ON, Canada) proposes that nothing lights up one’s life like a spark of inspiration from a noble mind.  In support of his argument, the author narrates how Swami Vivekananda inspired the world-famous sitar player Ravi Shankar and Monika Chakrabarty and how only a few words from the Nobel prize winner Enrico Fermi solved scientific enigmas for Maria Maier who herself later won the Nobel prize in Physics (Thinagi - Page 14).

  • Ravindra Godse (Pittsburgh, PA, USA) regales the readers with rollickingly funny remembrances of roughing it out during a tour of Nepal and Sikkim with boisterous and irreverent male and female M. D.s when they were all interns at the K. E. M. Hospital in Mumbai, India  (Sikkim va Nepalchi Safari - Page 16).

  • Sheela Pimplaskar (Philadelphia, PA, USA) introduces with the flair of a serious music lover the illustrious career of classical Hindustani vocalist Alaka Deo Marulkar. The author takes a special delight in narrating how Marulkar's singing career flourished from a very tender age under the tutelage of her own father and later under the guidance of several well-known maestros (Pandita Alaka Deo Marulkar - Page 21).

  • N. B. Datar (Toronto, ON, Canada) explains ten Sanskrit subhashitas that capture the very essence human nobility – the qualities of ‘sajjanas’.  Mr. Datar's explanations make it easy to appreciate the original Sanskrit compositions, even for those who had no formal education in Sanskrit (Kavya-Shastra-Vinodena, lekhank 23 - Page 25).

  • Rohini Dravid (Broomall, PA, USA) lovingly narrates how her relatives love Ollie, their pet dog and thrills the readers with tales of Ollie's exploits that end up in vexing, but humorous situations (Ollie re Ollie - Page 28).

  • Lata Deshpande (Ellicott City, MD, USA) takes a critical look at the way immigrants from Maharashtra behave when Americans are around and when they are in the company of fellow Maharashtrians or fellow Indians. While acknowledging that the behavior of Maharashtrians has undergone a change since settling down here as immigrants, the author reflects upon whether the change is a real transformation or whether it is only skin deep (Parivartan ki keval badal?  - Page 38).

  • Shalini Saraf (Mount Laurel, NJ, USA) weaves a very pleasant short story in which a widower and a widow, both with grown up and married children, feel rejuvenated in each other's company and finally tie the knot (Daratala Mepal - Page 42)

  • An elderly writer (from Australia), who wishes to remain anonymous, offers valuable suggestions about what the younger generations could and should do to enliven and to enrich the life of senior citizens (Amha mhatarya(n)na paradeshat kase vadhaval? - Page 46).

  • Madhuri Bapat (Thatcher, AZ, USA) shares with readers the humorously muddy details of an evening course in pottery making  (Phiratya chakavarati - Page 48).

  • Mrs. Swati Shriram Shevade (Taurango, New Zealand) provides a layman’s perspective at how anxiety grows into stress, tension and even illness and shares some experiences from the lives of her acquaintances and from her own life, which makes this short essay very enjoyable (Tension - Page 50).

  • Ekata pays tribute to late Durgabai Bhagwat, a towering scholar, sociologist and a serious student of folk literature of India (Page 53).

  • Vidyullekha Aklujkar (Richmond, B.C., Canada) pays a tribute to late Shanta Shelake, the celebrated poetess of Maharashtra and shares the memories of her personal encounters with Shanta Shelake (Ekek chandanine nabhadeepa pajalava - Page 55).

  • Suman Atre pays a poignant homage to her late husband, Mr. Ramachandra Atre, who passed away a year ago (Dhanya te marana - Page 54).

  • Ajit Kukade (Toronto, ON, Canada) shares the memories of his father Dr. L. D. Kukade of Pune, India, who passed away a quarter of a century ago (Vatavrikshachya chhayet - Page 57).

  • ENGLISH FORUM
    • Rasika Aklujkar (Richmond, B.C., Canada), who was born with Down's syndrome, narrates an inspiring account of how she has transformed her life by becoming a story-dancer and how it helps her communicate with and delight young and old in the audience (What I Do As A Story-Dancer - Page 59).
  • ASWAD - Neelima Kulkarni (Middletown, NJ, USA) presents an appreciation of a poem about a winter morning in Mumbai by the noted Marathi poet B. S. Mardhekar (Page 5).

  • POETRY- Poems by Vidyullekha Aklujkar (Richmond, B.C., Canada - mi sanatanachya japamaletila mani) and N. B. Datar (Toronto, ON, Canada - amhi tula hakalnar mhanaje hakalnar!). 

  • SHABDAKODE - Marathi crossword "Ranabheri" composed in her unique style by Sushama Yerawadekar (Jamaica Estates, NY, USA).  List of readers who submitted correct solutions to the previous crossword and a complete solution to the previous crossword are also published.

  • SAMASYAPURTI - Vidyullekha Aklujkar and Arun Jatkar conduct this contest in each issue of Ekata. The contest is open to all the subscribers of Ekata.  Contestants are required to submit compositions that are metrically similar to the samasya line and include the samasya as one of the lines.  Cash prizes ($ 25, $15 and $10) are offered to the best three entries.

  • PUSTAK PARICHAYA - In each issue, recently published Marathi books are introduced. In this issue:
    • Mrs. Padmini(Lata) Datar (Toronto, ON, Canada) has written about KARMACHA SIDDHANTA by Prof. R. S. Bhagwat.
    • Arun Jatkar (Monroeville, PA, USA) has introduced a collection of Marathi poems AJABA TUZE SARKAR by Anuradha Ganu.
  • CHITRAGUPTA – This is a picture puzzle, and readers are asked to articulate an answer using the clues seen in an accompanying cartoon and two lines of verse.

  • VACHAKANCHYA PRATIKRIYA - a readers' forum.  Readers share their views on material published in the previous issues of Ekata.